Award-Winning Documentary on Rhinebeck’s Aerodrome

Town of Lloyd Historical Preservation Society to Present Award-Winning Documentary on Rhinebeck’s Aerodrome

Imagine yourself flying in a small open-cockpit plane, nothing between you and the blue sky while you soar over the Hudson River, the fabric of the craft’s skin flapping around you. Co-producer Francesco Cordaro took that very flight, and will be present at the upcoming meeting of the Town of Lloyd Historical Preservation Society to discuss his experience.

“Terrifying,” is one word he uses to describe his flight, as well as ”beautiful and exhilarating,” while adding that “I would never have done it without a camera in my hands.”

Cordaro and two other young film makers, Devin Pickering and James Foster, based their project at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, home to the oldest airplane in the world and several other pioneering aircraft. Their movie stresses the sheer exuberance of flying so intimately connected to both the craft itself and the heavens. Cordaro will be present on Monday evening to describe making the movie, which took Best Short Documentary at the 2014 Newport Beach Film Festival.

Monday, March 2, 7:00pm (new time)
Theater, Building # 6, Vineyard Commons, 300 Vineyard Ave., Highland
Free. For more information, call (845) 255-7742 or visit www.tolhps.org

 

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Dutch-Style Kasten

 

Radcliff kas from the Historic Huguenot Street Permanent Collection

NEW PALTZ, NY (February 18, 2015) – Historic Huguenot Street seeks documentation of fine examples from private and museum collections of 18th-and early 19th-century Dutch-style cupboards known as grote kasten (singular kast). The documentation and study of these kasten will ultimately be part of an exhibit, symposium, and fully-illustrated compendium planned for 2016.

Although variations exist, the typical kast is a large, free-standing cupboard or wardrobe with two paneled doors surmounted by an over-scaled, molded cornice. The cupboard usually sits on a base with a single drawer or drawers and ball-shaped feet. Some simpler versions made by country craftsmen feature cut-out or stylized feet and may, or may-not have drawers. The planned study, exhibit and compendium will feature both styles.

“Kasten are known to have been made exclusively in New York, New Jersey, and coastal Connecticut beginning in the early colonial period and continuing, at least in the Hudson Valley, through the 18th century and into the early years of the 19th century,” explained Sanford Levy, Historic Huguenot Street Trustee and Vice President.

“As large, free-standing wardrobes, kasten were often the most valuable item owned by a family, and central to domestic life in colonial New York.  While serving a utilitarian function as the primary storage for clothing, linens, and other personal and domestic items, these impressive pieces were quintessential to the furnishings of Dutch-American homes, signifying the heritage of the owners, as well as their wealth and social status,” said Josephine Bloodgood, Historic Huguenot Street Collections Manager. “In the 18th century, kasten were often conspicuously placed where they could easily be viewed and admired by visitors.”

Historic Huguenot Street exhibits one of the largest collections of Hudson Valley kasten in the country. In bringing more kasten to light, the exhibit will expand public knowledge regarding the historical uses, construction, and conservation of these important pieces of material culture.

To submit photos or information about kasten, please contact the Curatorial Department at Historic Huguenot Street at 845-255-0180 or collections@huguenotstreet.org.

A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original 1678 settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.  It was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve their French and Dutch heritage.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today. 

 A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a past- VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Education, Historic Sites, Museums, Press Releases, Town/Village of New Paltz, Ulster County | Leave a comment

Upcoming Event: “Around Highland”

CANCELLATION NOTICE: Unfortunately, due to the potential for poor weather on February 21, the “Around Highland” program has been canceled.

 

Join the Plattekill Historical Preservation Society on Saturday, February 21, for a virtual tour “Around Highland” with Vivian Wadlin.

Author Vivian Yess Wadlin, who co-wrote Around Highland with Ethan P. Jackman, is the publisher of Ulster County’s About Town, and is well-known for her work with several local historical organizations and her extensive collection of historical artifacts.

The history of Highland began on the shores of the Hudson River in 1754, when entrepreneur Anthony Yelverton started a sawmill, later followed by a brickyard, store, and ferry service to Poughkeepsie. During the 19th century, steamboats made regular stops near Yelverton’s settlement. Starting around 1830, riverfront businesses began to relocate to the “high land” above the river, and a new Highland business district was born. The West Shore Railroad was completed in 1883, with a station at the riverfront. The area was called Highland Landing. The Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge, now the Walkway Over the Hudson, was completed in 1888, and in 1897, a trolley line began operation from Highland Landing up to the Highland village and, from there, westward. Highland had a new claim to fame as the “Gateway to Ulster County.”

Copies of Around Highland will be available for purchase. The program begins at 2 p.m. at the Clintondale Firehouse, located at 1063 Route 44/55 in Clintondale. It is free to the public and light refreshments will be served.

For more information or directions, call (845) 389-7998, email plattekillhistoricalsociety@gmail.com or visit the Plattekill Historical Preservation Society’s Facebook page.

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Arson in the “Gunks”

The_American_Fireman_by_Louis_Maurer_1858-Library of Congress

Every day I drive through the Minnewaska State Preserve where the great fire of 2008 burned thousands of acres. It was one of the most spectacular natural events I have ever witnessed and helped contain as a firefighter. While driving that stretch of the mountains, I sometimes start to think about past fires such as the fires which occurred in the summer of 1909.

In August 1909, residents who lived in the Shawangunks and communities that surrounded it were concerned about the drought that had griped the mountains. It was a very dry summer. It would not take much to ignite the dry underbrush of the mountains.  Fire was no stranger to the “Gunks.” Berry pickers periodically lit monster blazes to ensure a good crop of berries the following year. They mostly burned away brush that choked out the berry plants.

When a fire broke out in early August 1909, people felt it was just a berry picker fire. Even as the fire grew out of control it was felt that some berry pickers had probably neglected it. This had happened before. It was felt, as in years past, eventually rains would come and  help extinguish the blaze. However, as the fire continued to grow consuming more and more acreage, local residents  were reminded of May 1906 when a fire raged from Lake Minnewaska to Wa

warsing consuming thousands of acres. The 1906 fire came close to consuming Kerhonkson. It was halted by citizens and firefighters under direction of Fire Warden Fluckiger.

When the Minnewaska mountain houses were threatened by this latest fire, firefighters responded from New Paltz, Mohonk, and Kerhonkson in order to protect the mountain houses. It became apparent that the 1909 fire between Minnewaska and Awosting was different. Firefighters began to suspect foul play when a new fire started in a stand of chestnuts which was not berry habitat. Furthermore, it was too far from the main fire for embers to have drifted and ignited the stand of trees.  Arson became suspected as the cause of these wildfires; not berry pickers. Stoking these fears was a suspicious fire at Wildmere, one of the mountain house on Lake Minnewaska, a barn caught fire late at night.

Firefighters were eventually able to bring the fires under control. In an effort to contain flare-ups, they hauled hogsheads of water by wagon to the fire locations. The barrels would be left there  as a water source if the fires rekindled. Just as expected, it was reported that some of the fires had rekindled. Firefighters hiked up to the fire confident that they could extinguish it with the water they had earlier positioned close to the fire.  What they discovered when they finally reached their destinations was that someone had emptied all the barrels and thrown them into the fire. If there was any doubt that fires were the work of an arsonist, this confirmed it.  Residents demanded action from the authorities who tried to reassure citizens that the culprit would be apprehended. Frustrated, citizens formed patrols threatening that if anyone was seen looking like they were lighting new fires or were where they did not belong they would be shot dead.

Overlook Fire of 08'-Author

There are no indications that the arsonist or arsonists were ever caught. Just as quickly as the suspicious fires started is how quickly they stopped.  The fires were eventually brought back under control and with the help of heavy rains, which broke the drought, were finally extinguished.

 

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a past- VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Bringing the Wicked to Justice, Firefighting, Shawangunk Mountains | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Celebrate Washington’s Birthday

George Washington by Robert Field (1800)

NEWBURGH, NY – Depending on where you are or who you talk to, the third Monday in February represents either Presidents’ Day or Washington’s Birthday. At three Revolutionary War historic sites in the Hudson Valley, the third Monday is one day of a three day celebration of our beloved Commander-in-Chief, George Washington. The Friends of the State Historic Sites of the Hudson Highlands (FSHSHH) are offering an inclusive schedule to the array of activities taking place at Washington’s Headquarters, Knox’s Headquarters, and the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Sites. This year’s events takes place on February 14th, 15th, and 16th. Each day offers something new.

The schedule of activities gives a basic description of each site, contact information, and a map to assist visitors with navigating between locations. The schedule is available to download through FSHSHH’s Facebook page or by clicking here.

Admission to the events is free, but donations are requested. Support for these programs is provided by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission, the Palisades Park Conservancy, and the Friends of the State Historic Sites of the Hudson Highlands.

Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh, NY

Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site

Washington’s Headquarters will be open all three days between 12:00 PM and 4:00 PM. A George Washington re-enactor will begin the celebration each day by cutting through his birthday cake. The historic headquarters will be open to the public where they will be greeted by the General and other interpreters in period dress, while musician Thad McGregor provides musical entertainment.

Reenactors from the 5th New York Regiment, Lamb’s Artillery, 2nd New York and 5th Connecticut Regiments will be performing military drills and giving presentations about their regimental history. At the end of the day their activities will culminate in a review of the troops by the General.

In the Museum, children can make a take-home craft and guest speakers will offer talks on 18th century subjects:

FSHSHH 2015GWBC schedule

Author Jack Kelly will speak on the subject of his book, Band of Giants: The Amateur Soldiers Who Won America’s Independence, giving a more personal view of the important but lesser known figures of the Revolution.

Guest speaker Matt Thorenz will deliver his talk “Black Patriots Revealed: The Black Presence at New Windsor Cantonment…” about the valuable contributions Continental soldiers of African descent made to the Continental Army during its final winter encampment at New Windsor, New York in 1782-83.

Aaron Robinson, Interpretive Programs Assistant of Washington’s Headquarters, will present his talk, “Loyalists: The Other Side of the American Revolution,” highlighting the side of the war that is not often mentioned today, the side of those who decided not to rebel against the Crown.

Karen Monti, site interpreter, offers an interactive program titled “From Petticoats to Breeches: Unveiling 18th Century Clothing” to provide insight into the lives of 18th century people and what they wore. Examples of 18th century clothing will assist in creating a more complete picture of the uses, reason, and choices of such articles of clothing made by individuals from that era.

Matthew Colon, site interpreter, invites the public to look back upon the field of 18th century medicine in his talk, “18th Century Medicine: the Physician, the Silver Bullet, and the Revolution”. Discover how the stories of local doctors reveal true concern for their fellow man or elevate others as heroes at a time of war.

Lynette Scherer, site interpreter, in her talk, “‘To Save the Innocent, I Demand the Guilty’ A Tale of Two Revolutionary War Prisoners,” will tell the story of two prisoners; one hanged, one too young to die. Learn how these two captive soldiers nearly derailed the impending peace and caused an international incident for General George Washington in Newburgh, New York.

Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site is located at the corner of Liberty and Washington Streets within the City of Newburgh’s East End Historic District. For more information please call (845) 562-1195.

Knox’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Vails Gate, NY

Knox’s Headquarters State Historic Site

Knox’s Headquarters is open for tours on Sunday between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM. At this headquarters through the winter of 1780-81, General Knox organized the artillery for the projected attack on New York City.  Soldiers at the nearby encampment repaired and trained on the guns, howitzers, and mortars.  Tours of the house begin at 10:00 AM, 11:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 1:00 PM, 2:00 PM and 3:00 PM. Cannon demonstrations take place at 11:45 AM, 1:45 PM and 3:45 PM.

This elegant stone house, also known as “Mount Ellison”, is a genteel combination of English and Dutch-style and was built for the prominent local merchant Colonel Thomas Ellison.

During the American Revolution, Continental Army Generals Nathanael Greene, Henry Knox, and Horatio Gates used this house as a military headquarters.  Inside these walls, General Knox planned and directed the gathering of the artillery that was used to win the Battle of Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781.  In 1783, Major John Armstrong, at the urging of nationalists in the Continental Congress, wrote the Newburgh Addresses, calling for the army to menace the government with military force.

Knox’s Headquarters is located at 289 Forge Hill Road in Vails Gate, New York, three miles south of the intersection of I-87 and I-84 and one mile south of the co-located National Purple Heart Hall of Honor and the New Windsor Cantonment.  For more information please call (845) 561-1765, ext. 22.

New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site, New Windsor, NY.

New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site

The nearby New Windsor Cantonment is open on Saturday and Monday between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM. Soldiers will bring to life the Continental Army’s final winter encampment with blacksmithing and medical demonstrations, and other aspects of daily life. On both days at 11:00 AM, 1:30 PM and 3:30 PM, see musket and cannon demonstrations.  Following these firings, children enlist in the Continental Army, drill with wooden muskets, and get paid in Continental currency for their service.

Following the capture of British forces by the allied armies of France and America at Yorktown, the northern Continental Army returned to the Hudson Highlands.  This significant defeat of the British field army in the south broke England’s will to continue the struggle.  In the fall of 1782 near New Windsor, 7,500 Continental Army soldiers built a city of 600 log huts. Along with some of their family members, they braved through the winter and kept a wary eye on the 12,000 British troops in New York City, just 60 miles to their south.

During the winter of 1782-83, discontent filled the New Windsor encampment as the men bitterly reflected upon their ill-treatment by an ungrateful nation. Heavily armed and angry, the disgruntled officers and soldiers of the Continental Army were the biggest threat to the future of the country.

New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site is located on Route 300, 374 Temple Hill Road in New Windsor, New York.  For more information please call (845) 561-1765, ext. 22.

The Friends of the State Historic Sites of the Hudson Highlands (FSHSHH) is a registered 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization that exists in order to benefit three New York State Historic Sites – Washington’s Headquarters, New Windsor Cantonment, and Knox’s Headquarters. The supported historic sites gain from this organization’s mission to increase public awareness of the three sites’ historical and educational significance; to raise funds to be used to supplement the educational, programming and collection needs of the sites; and to offer quality education and history related items for sale to site visitors. For more information in regard to membership contact them at Friends.SHSHH@gmail.com.

Posted in City of Newburgh, Education, Historic Sites, Landmarks, Museums, Orange County, Press Releases, Revolutionary War, Wars | Leave a comment

Author Vernon Benjamin to speak in Ellenville

The History of the Hudson River Valley-EPLM

Ellenville, NY: On Thursday, February 12, 6:30pm, local history lecturer and former journalist Vernon Benjamin’s will discuss the remarkable history of our Hudson River Valley from the first Native Americans to the Civil War, based on his new book.“The History of the Hudson River Valley”. From ancient geology to historic figures, this comprehensive book includes coverage of known facts and some surprising details. Benjamin himself is worth listening too – discussion, not “power point”, is his way – and he gears his talks to specific audiences, spicing them with anecdote and humor. Students, educators, visitors, historians and “locals” will enjoy this interesting and at times provocative presentation about the history of our wonderful Valley.

Currently a Trustee at Saugerties Public Library, Vernon Benjamin has lectured at Marist and Bard Colleges as well as throughout the Hudson Valley. His book was released in the summer of 2014. Copies will be available for purchase, and a signing will follow his talk. Ellenville Public Library & Museum, 40 Center Street, Ellenville 845-647-5530.  Free and open to the public.
A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a past VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Education, Hudson River, Ulster County | Leave a comment

WILLA SKINNER TO RECEIVE THE 2015 MARTHA WASHINGTON WOMAN OF HISTORY AWARD

 

J. Tate Washington's Headquarters Newburgh (Jonathan Hasbrouck House) 1869 in a private collection used by permission

(Newburgh, NY … February 3, 2015)  Historian/author Willa Skinner is this year’s recipient of the Martha Washington Woman of History  Award. This award is given by Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site each year to a woman who has made a contribution to the history of the Hudson Valley through education, promotion, or preservation. The honor was inspired by Martha Washington, an outstanding woman in history who resided in the Hudson Valley with her husband, General George Washington, during the last days of the Revolutionary War.   

Mrs. Skinner holds a journalism degree from New York University and is one of the founding members of the Fishkill Historical Society which owns and operates the Van Wyck Homestead Museum. She serves on the publication committee of the Dutchess County Historical Society, is a member of the Dutchess County Municipal Historians Association, and on the state level, the Association of Public Historians of New York State (APHNYS). 

She has taught Tracing your House’s Roots for Dutchess County Community College, is the author of Signal Fires in the Highlands, and Remembering Fishkill, a collection of historical vignettes. She has conducted classes on local history for area schools and wrote a column for the Southern Dutchess News and Beacon Free Press, for more than forty years. 

As Mrs. Skinner has said, “When I was appointed town historian in 1964, I began a journey into the region’s past and found that opening one door led to the opening of another, a never ending journey but always enjoyable. I met real people and imaginary ones, heard stories handed down from one generation to the next no matter if they were embroidered or not as they were passed along, listened to tales told by natives and newcomers alike and shared them with readers…”

The award presentation will take place on Sunday, March 22nd at Washington’s Headquarters, during their Women’s History Month program, The General’s Lady. The public is welcome to attend the program, starting at 2:00 PM. For further details or directions, call 845-562-1195.

 Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site is a registered national historic landmark. It is located at the corner of Liberty and Washington Streets within the city of Newburgh’s East End Historic District.  The site is one of 35 historic sites within the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and is one of 28 facilities administered by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission in New York and New Jersey.  For more information about New York State Parks, please visit our website at www.nysparks.com.  For more information call 845-562-1195 or visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/washingtons headquarters.

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a past VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

 

 

 

Posted in City of Newburgh, Landmarks, Museums, Orange County, Revolutionary War | Leave a comment

Picturing the Past: Balmville’s Cider Mill

A 1930s image of the W.L. Mackay and Sons Fruit Growers Cider Mill in Balmville.

Driving along Route 9W in Balmville in the town of Newburgh, one cannot miss the large windmill that has been synonymous with the Morehead family’s auto dealerships for over half a century. In its earlier life, however, the iconic structure was part of the W.L. Mackay and Son Cider Mill. The Mackay family, from Lattintown in the town of Marlborough, were well known fruit growers and poultry farmers, and the Cider Mill “along the south road” was one outlet for selling their products.

An undated postcard image of Arnold Mackay. (Author's collection)

W.L. Mackay’s son, Arnold, added a unique product to the stand in the 1930s that made the Cider Mill an even more popular roadside attraction. Capitalizing on the popularity of jigsaw puzzles as a form of entertainment during the Great Depression, he began creating complex puzzles that he would sell at the fruit stand. One newspaper noted that his “fiendish ingenuity” in creating the detailed wooden pieces left many local puzzlers “wandering about the streets tearing their hair and staring into space” for the solutions. One legendary puzzle contained more than 400 pieces, unheard of at a time when each piece was painstakingly created by hand.

The puzzle fad passed and by 1946, the fruit stand itself was no more, having been sold to the Morehead family for use as the home of Morehead Auto Sales, a used car dealership. Despite the vast changes along the Route 9W corridor since the 1930s, however, the landmark windmill still remains as a reminder of the long-gone W.L. Mackay and Son Cider Mill.

Arnold's wife Ruth at the Cider Mill. (Author's collection)

Antoinette Albano and Ruth Mackay in front of the Cider Mill. (Author's collection)

Posted in Landmarks, Orange County, Picturing the Past, Town of Marlborough, Town of Newburgh | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Historic Huguenot Street Appoints Prestigious Scholarly Advisory Board

Historic Huguenot Street with Deyo House-HHS

NEW PALTZ, NY (January 29, 2015) – Historic Huguenot Street, one of the first organizations dedicated to preservation and education in the country, is pleased to announce that eleven historians have chosen to be part of its newly formed Scholarly Advisory Board. Their individual commitment to history and education will aid them in guiding the organization’s historic interpretations while overseeing the scholarship provided to guests at the museum and National Historic Landmark District. The board is chaired by Dr. L.H. Roper, Professor of History at SUNY New Paltz.

The eleven members of the Scholarly Advisory Board, including Dr. Roper, are Dr. Leslie Choquette, Professor of Francophone Cultures and Director of the French Institute at Assumption College, Worcester, Mass.; Dr. Joseph Diamond, Associate Professor and Anthropology Department Chair at SUNY New Paltz; Dr. Firth Haring Fabend, historian and author of New Netherland and colonial New York; Dr. Jaap Jacobs, Honorary Lecturer at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland; Dr. Wim Klooster, Professor and History Department Chair at Clark University, Worcester, Mass.; Dr. Dennis Maika, Associate for Education and Web Content at The New Netherland Institute, Albany; Dr. James Merrell, Professor of History at Vassar College; Dr. Paul Otto, Professor of American History at George Fox University, Portland, Oregon; Dr. Bertrand Van Ruymbeke, Professor of American Studies at the Université de Paris 8, France; and Dr. David Voorhees, Director of the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History in Hudson, New York.

This new board of scholars will help to ensure historical accuracy of the interpretive programming at the museum and National Historic Landmark while guiding interpretive goals for the future. These eleven historians offer fresh perspectives and a wide range of knowledge and research while sharing a mutual passion for American, French, Dutch, Native American, New York, Atlantic, and Huguenot history – all of which are a part of the Historic Huguenot Street’s story.

“Historic Huguenot Street is confident that this newly appointed Scholarly Advisory Board will aid us in interpreting and presenting our historic buildings, objects, and documents in the most educational and relatable ways,” said Mary Etta Schneider, Historic Huguenot Street President and Board Chair. “These scholars will provide instrumental scholarship and support as we continue to share the rich history of New Paltz and its Huguenot roots with the public. We are grateful and honored that they are now closely associated with us.”

 

  • Dr. Choquette received her Ph.D. in History from Harvard University and is Director of The French Institute at Assumption College, which serves to foster the preservation and research of French ethnicity in America. She has authored numerous works on the French in North America, including the prize-winning book, Frenchmen into Peasants: Modernity and Tradition in the Peopling of French Canada (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1997).

 

  • In addition to serving as Anthropology Department Chair, Dr. Diamond instructs the Archaeology Field School at SUNY New Paltz, which performs annual archeological digs on Huguenot Street. A leading authority on Native societies of the Hudson Valley during the pre-contact and contact periods, Dr. Diamond received his Ph.D. from The University at Albany.

 

  • Dr. Fabend received her Ph.D. in American Studies from New York University. She has published numerous books and novels on the Dutch colonial period in New York and New Jersey, including A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies, 1660-1800 (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1991, 1999), which received the New York State Historical Association Annual Manuscript Award and the Hendricks Prize of the New Netherland Institute. Dr. Fabend is a Fellow of the Holland Society of New York and the New Netherland Institute.

 

  • Dr. Jacobs serves as co-editor – along with Drs. Roper and Van Ruymbeke – of the Journal of Early American History and book series The American Colonies, 1500-1830. He is the author of numerous works on New Netherland, including The Colony of New Netherland: A Dutch Settlement in Seventeenth-Century America (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009) and is the co-editor with Dr. Roper of The Worlds of the Seventeenth-Century Hudson Valley (Albany: SUNY Press, 2014). Dr. Jacobs received his Ph.D. from Leiden University in the Netherlands.

 

  • A leading authority on Dutch activity in the Atlantic World during the early modern period, Dr. Klooster is the Chair of the Department of History at Clark University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Leiden, is co-editor Brill’s Atlantic World series, and has authored and co-edited eight books, including Revolutions in the Atlantic World (New York: New York University Press, 2009).

 

  •  Dr. Maika is currently Associate for Education at the New Netherland Institute. In 2012, he was the Senior Scholar in Residence at the New Netherland Research Center and also Coordinator of the Teaching Fellows Program at the Rockefeller Archive Center. He received his Ph.D. in History from New York University; his dissertation was awarded the Hendricks Manuscript Prize. A Fellow of the Holland Society of New York, the New Netherland Institute, the New York Academy of History, he has served as a consultant for local history and education projects and has written numerous articles and papers. He is currently working on a book about Manhattan merchants and their city in the Dutch and English periods of seventeenth-century New York history. As a professional educator, he taught History and Psychology at the high school and college levels for several decades and won several teaching awards.

 

  • Dr. Merrell, the Lucy Maynard Salmon Professor of History at Vassar College, received his Ph.D.  from The Johns Hopkins University. He has written two Bancroft Prize-winning books on early American history—The Indians’ New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact through the Era of Removal (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989) and Into the American Woods: Negotiators on the Pennsylvania Frontier (New York: W.W. Norton, 1989), making him one of the few historians to have won the award twice. Into the American Woods was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History.  Dr. Merrell also serves as a member of Historic Huguenot Street’s Board of Trustees.

 

  • Dr. Otto received his Ph.D. from Indiana University and currently teaches at George Fox University, where he serves as department chair for History, Politics, and International Studies. He has published extensively on seventeenth-century European-American relations, including The Dutch-Munsee Encounter in America: The Struggle for Sovereignty in the Hudson Valley (Bergahn Books, 2006), and received numerous research fellowships. He also serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Early American History.

 

  • Dr. Roper serves as co-editor – along with Drs. Jacobs and Van Ruymbeke – of the Journal of Early American History, and book series The American Colonies, 1500-1830. He is the author of numerous books and articles on seventeenth-century Anglo-America, including Advancing Empire: English Interests and Overseas Activity, 1614-1688 (forthcoming from Cambridge University Press).  Dr. Roper received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Rochester.

 

  • Dr. Van Ruymbeke serves as co-editor – along with Drs. Jacobs and Roper – of the Journal of Early American History, and book series The American Colonies, 1500-1830. A leading authority on the Huguenot diaspora, Dr. Van Ruymbeke has authored and co-edited numerous books and articles, including the prize-winning From New Babylon to New Eden: The Huguenots and Their Migration to South Carolina (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2006) and L’Amérique avant les États-Unis. Une histoire de l’Amérique anglaise 1497-1776 (Flammarion, 2013), as well as The Huguenots in France and the Atlantic Diaspora, co-edited with Randy Sparks (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2003). He received his Ph.D. in American Civilization from the Université de Paris III.

 

  • Dr. Voorhees is Director of the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History located in Hudson, New York, as well as editor of the Papers of Jacob Leisler Project.  The Jacob Leisler Institute, which also houses the papers of Jacob Leisler (1640-1691), focuses on the transition period from Dutch to English culture in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Voorhees is also Managing Editor of de Halve Maen, a scholarly journal devoted to New Netherland studies published by The Holland Society of New York and the prize-winning author and editor of many essays on Leisler and his world. Dr. Voorhees received his Ph.D. from New York University.

 

A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original 1678 settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.  It was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve their French and Dutch heritage.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, which is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today.

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SOCIETY JOINTLY ANNOUNCES “REWARDING A’s” PROGRAM AND 2015 SCHOLARSHIP

Lawn being cut with a Coldwell Lawn Mower, ca. 1920. Photo collection of Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh, NY, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

NEWBURGH, NY – The Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands is pleased to announce that a $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to an eligible student who shows an interest in history and related fields of study.

Applicants must be deserving college bound high school seniors or college students from the Hudson Highlands region who have shown an interest in the history of the area and have demonstrated this interest through participation in related activities. Applications can be downloaded through the Society’s website (www.newburghhistoricalsociety.com).

Applications are due by June 15, 2015. For more information call (845) 561-2585.

In conjunction with their scholarship announcement, the Society has created a reward program for students who achieve excellent marks in the classroom. Their “Rewarding A’s” program exchanges free tours of their headquarters, the 1830 Captain David Crawford House, for a letter grade “A” or an equivalent mark in any course. Tours will be available on Sundays between 1:00 PM and 4:00 PM.

Warren Cahill, Chairman of the Scholarship and Awards Committee, said in a prepared statement, “receiving an A is truly an achievement by any student and we’re interested in giving parents the option of a unique reward.”

The program benefits eligible students in grades Pre-K through Grade Twelve enrolled within the 2014 – 2015 school year. Students must be accompanied by a parent or guardian while attending the events and tours organized by the Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands. The reward does not extend to the accompanying parent or guardian to whom regular admission rates apply.

The Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands was launched unofficially when the Hasbrouck House (Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh) was in danger of demolition after the Revolutionary War. The current Society, incorporated in 1884, has always been an advocate for Newburgh’s history. Society headquarters, the 1830 Captain David Crawford House, was purchased by the Society in 1954 to save it from demolition, symbolizes their dedication to preserving and protecting Newburgh’s assets.

The Crawford House, located at 189 Montgomery Street within the City of Newburgh’s Historic District, is open for tours by appointment during the winter season. Admission is $5.00 per person. For more information about admission, tours, or programming please call (845) 561-2585.

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