“Santa Paws” Arrives on Huguenot Street

DuBois Fort-Author

NEW PALTZ, NY – Historic Huguenot Street will open its doors on Small Business Saturday, November 29, for a dog-friendly holiday sale in the Museum Store. Throughout the day, doggy daycare will be available for those with furry friends, and dogs are invited to take a photo with Santa from 10 am – 12 pm for $10 (sponsored in part by Sue’s Zoo). Dogs must be vaccinated and leashed to participate.

Dogs have a history on Huguenot Street dating back to before the arrival of Europeans.  In archaeological excavations over the last decade, remains of a companion dog, ceremoniously buried, were found on what is today Huguenot Street. Our canine friends have played on the Street from at least that time, and continue to today.

During the sale, the Museum Store on Huguenot Street will be offering discounts on select merchandise, including jewelry, children’s toys and crafts, and other locally-produced, hand-made gifts exclusive to Historic Huguenot Street. Shoppers can expect to receive 20% off of most items, with select items up to 50% off. All sales directly benefit Historic Huguenot Street.

The holiday sale will begin at the Historic Huguenot Street Museum Store on Friday, November 28 and continue through Sunday, November 30. The Museum Store is located in the DuBois Fort Visitor Center at 81 Huguenot Street. Historic Huguenot Street and the Museum Store will be open every Saturday and Sunday 10 am – 5 pm through December 21 with special holiday tours available.

A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original 1678 settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.  It was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve their French and Dutch heritage.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today.

Posted in Museums, Town/Village of New Paltz, Ulster County | Leave a comment

Wildmere and Cliff House

Wildmere -1903 Library of Congress

A couple of weeks ago I went for a relaxing walk around Lake Minnewaksa. It is a favorite destination for me. Half way around the lake I decided to sit on a rock and eat a sandwich that I had packed. While sitting there I remembered as a child coming up to Lake Minnewaska before it was a park. It was some 37 years ago when at the opposite end of the lake stood Wildmere Mountain House. Wildmere holds a place in my heart because it is where I fell in love with horses. I still remember that horse’s name-Tomato.

Today, Minnewaska State Park Preserve has become a popular destination for hikers, bikers, and nature lovers. It is crisscrossed with acres of pristine views, carriage trails, and hiking trails. Many people visiting there do not realize that it once was the site of two spectacular mountain houses that sat perched on the cliffs overlooking Lake Minnewaska. They were named Wildmere and Cliff House.

The start of these two mountain houses can be traced back to the Smiley twins, Alfred and Albert, who earlier founded the famous landmark Mohonk Mountain House.

The site of the first mountain house, Cliff House, was first viewed in 1875 when Alfred and his brother were on a day excursion from the Mohonk Mountain House which they founded years earlier. Alfred decided that Lake Minnewaska, which was then called Coxing Pond, would be a perfect site for a mountain house. He was determined to find out who owned Coxing Pond.

Shortly after visiting the pond, Alfred inquired about who owned the lake. He was told, according to the book Mohonk: Its People and Spirit, that George Davis owned it. Eventually, Alfred purchased over 2,000 acres of land and construction commenced, in 1877, on the first of two mountain houses. The first mountain house would be named Cliff House.

The mountain house was completed by 1878, and Alfred, who was at the time the manager of Mohonk, moved with his family to Cliff House. Guests who stayed at Cliff House were allowed to travel back and forth between Mohonk and Cliff House by way of a carriage road. Eventually, another hotel on the opposite side of Lake Minnewaska, christened Wildmere, was completed in 1881. The combined houses could accommodate over 400 guests. Alfred Smiley continued to expand the property until his death in 1903. 

The Minnewaska Mountain Houses remained in the Smiley family until 1955 when they were acquired by the Phillips family in 1955. Kenneth B. Phillips, Sr. worked for the Smiley family; as stated in a newspaper interview, he came to Minnewaska in 1927. Lake Minnewaska’s mountain houses continued to thrive until the late 1960s and early 1970s when interest in the mountain houses began to decline. Finally by 1972, Cliff House was abandoned because the Phillips family did not have the financial resources for the upkeep of the mountain house. It was decided that the family’s resources should be concentrated in Wildmere. A fateful mistake had been made by the family when they shut the water off to Cliff House, which also cancelled the insurance policy on the structure. 

New York State, by this time, hoped to avoid development of this pristine area of Ulster County. In 1969, the state began purchasing property from the family. In addition to New York State, the Nature Conversancy also started to buy parts of the property. According to The Daily Freeman, by October 2000, the state purchased 7,000 acres for 1.5 million dollars. 

By 1976, the owners of the Cliff House and Wildmere filed for bankruptcy. Brian Anglin wrote that in 1977, the Philips family, who was now out of money, put Minnewaska up for sale. New York State eventually moved in and purchased 1,400 acres of land with an additional 200 acre easement. Anglin continued that after all the purchases had been made over the years, the family was left with 1,200 acres which included the two mountain houses and the lands around them. Phillips, Jr., who ran the resorts, hoped to reopen Cliff House and also build luxury condos on the property. The furniture, and anything of value, was auctioned off by the family. Concerns emerged about vagrants who were lighting fires and destroying the empty hotel. There was fear of a fire starting in the abandoned structure; that fear became reality in the first days of 1978. 

According to most sources, such as The New York Times, the fire that destroyed the Cliff House started in the evening of New Year’s Day. A report of a structure fire was phoned into the Accord Fire Department at 8:30 PM. Accord Fire Chief Lowell Baker, whose district the hotels were located in, arrived first on the scene. Seeing the size of the fire, which was spreading quickly through the wood structure, he promptly called for mutual aid from the neighboring Kerhonkson Fire District as well as from other local fire departments. As the flames leapt 75 feet into the winter sky, according to The Huguenot Herald, fire-fighting vehicles headed to the scene but were halted on Route 44/55 at the gate to the property. A heavy snow continued to fall and it prohibited safe travel up to the hotel.

Those trucks that attempted to navigate the snowy, icy, twisting, and winding approach to the mountaintop resort realized that their attempts were futile. The vehicles did not have chains on their wheels and had to turn back, or in some cases, slide back. Only those trucks that had four-wheel-drive were able to make it to the top. As the heavy snow continued to hamper firefighting efforts, The Newburgh Evening News reported that the water and sprinklers had been shut off in the structure; this denied firefighters a valuable water source once they were able to get to the top of the mountain.

The awful fire was over by 12:30 AM; a century of history was reduced to smoking ruins. The community mourned the loss of the mountain house. Fortunately, Wildmere still stood unscathed. It too finally closed in 1979. The fight was on to save this environmental treasure from development, which appeared imminent by way of the Marriott Corporation who wanted to build a high-end resort. This plan was finally defeated in 1985.  

Unfortunately, however, on a Thursday afternoon in June of 1986, Wildmere also burned down and brought to an end the era of the grand mountain houses of Lake Minnewaska. New York State finally bought the rest of the

Wildmere 1903-Library of Congress

Lake Minnewaska resort, and opened the preserve that many people still enjoy today. According to a recent Poughkeepsie Journal article, the Minnewaska property has grown from its original 10,000 acres to about 22,000 currently. The most recent acquisition was Little Stony Kill Falls.

Posted in Education, Firefighting, Lost Landmarks, Shawangunk Mountains, Town of Gardiner, Town of Rochester, Town of Wawarsing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Historic Huguenot Street to Host SUNY New Paltz Ceramics Program Exhibit

Picture Courtesy of HHS

NEW PALTZ, NY (November 14, 2014) – Historic Huguenot Street has collaborated with the Ceramics program at SUNY New Paltz to present “Insight/On Site,” an exhibit of student artworks, on Saturday, November 22, from 3 pm to 6 pm. Inspired by the structures and collections of Historic Huguenot Street, works will be displayed throughout the historic homes and the artists will be present to speak about their art, their inspiration, and the artistic process. General admission is $15; admission is $10 for seniors, military, students, and members of Historic Huguenot Street. Admission is free for SUNY New Paltz students with ID.

“Insight/On Site” will feature artwork by New Paltz undergraduate and graduate Ceramics students, providing an opportunity to revisit New Paltz history while encouraging students to develop their own unique expressions, interpreting traditional artifacts in a contemporary manner. The first “Insight/On Site” exhibit was hosted at Historic Huguenot Street in 2012 in collaboration with the SUNY New Paltz Metal program.

“This collaboration is a perfect example of the extensive educational partnership between Historic Huguenot Street and SUNY New Paltz,” said Board President Mary Etta Schneider. “As a historic site, Huguenot Street is uniquely capable of providing engaging and enriching educational opportunities for our community’s students.”

“We are pleased that our students and the art department are partnering again this year with Historic Huguenot Street on this project,” said SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian. “It’s exciting that our ceramics students are drawing artistic inspiration from local history, and that the College can support programs at HHS in the process.  This is precisely the kind of regional collaboration that we want to build.”  The SUNY New Paltz Ceramics program offers an extensive curriculum in all aspects of traditional and contemporary ceramics practices and technologies in a state-of-the-art facility with teachers who are actively engaged artists.

A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original 1678 settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.  It was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve their French and Dutch heritage.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today.

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Education, Historic Sites, Town/Village of New Paltz, Ulster County | Leave a comment

First Peoples of the Esopus: Native American Music and Storytelling

On Saturday, November 15, 2014, the Klyne Esopus Museum’s Roger Mabie Speaker Series continues with guests Reverend Nick Miles and Friends, who will present “Native American Music and Storytelling.” The program will take place at 4:00 p.m. in the Town of Esopus Town Hall Community Room, 284 Broadway in Ulster Park.

Reverend Miles, also known as Tecumseh Red Cloud, is a member of the Pamunkey Tribe, Powhatan Nation. He is the Lead Singer and Drum Keeper of the Cloud Breaker Society, who along with the Red Feather Singers, are members of the Association of Native Americans of the Mid-Hudson Valley.

Miles will share Native songs from various traditions, Evan Pritchard will offer a sample of Native Flute music and a Native Lullaby will be sung. Miles will also speak about the importance of storytelling in native cultures.

Admission is free and light refreshments will be served. This program is underwritten by Aardvark Realty of St. Remy. The Klyne Esopus Museum, located in Ulster Park, New York, is housed in a former 1827 Dutch country church. The museum offers a variety of exhibits about the culture, commerce and history of The Town of Esopus. Call 845-532-5548 for more information.

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An Unforgiving Land: Hardscrabble Life in the Trapps Lecture on November 9

Davis house stone foundation ruin, Gardiner, NY-Wikipedia

Marbletown, New York (November 8 ) Authors Josephson and Larsen present their newest book, an illustrated history of a small, hardscrabble community in the Shawangunk Mountains of Ulster County where today’s Mohonk Preserve and Minnewaska State Park Preserve now lie. From early post-Revolutionary days through World War II, a few hardy families scratched out a living atop the mountain, defying an unforgiving and isolated terrain. For generations they lived off the land, working subsistence farms and harvesting raw materials from the forest and earth, having only each other to rely upon. Today only a few vestiges of this proud and independent community remain. The rest has vanished along with the way of life that sustained it. Our authors tell the remarkable story of the Trapps people and how the hamlet was honored with placement on the National and State Registers of Historic Places the first time New York State has recognized the historic importance of a vanished, hardscrabble community.

Admission is $7 to general public free for UCHS members, books will be for sale at event.

The Bevier House Museum

2682 Route 209, Marbletown

(845) 338-5614; uchsdirector@gmail.com

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Education, Lost Landmarks, Shawangunk Mountains, Strange Stories, Town of Gardiner, Town/Village of New Paltz, Ulster County | Leave a comment

Historic Huguenot Street Vandalized on Halloween Night

Burial Ground New Paltz-AJ Schenkman

NEW PALTZ, NY (November 7, 2014) – The board and staff of Historic Huguenot Street are saddened to report that on Halloween night, the Nations Historic Landmark District’s burial ground was vandalized. Photos of the destruction were taken and a police report has been filed with the New Paltz Police Department. Historic Huguenot Street is now working to remove the graffiti without doing any further damage to these nationally significant and irreplaceable stones.

“We are lucky, in a sense, because the graffiti is not spray paint and can be removed with a water-based cleaning method,” explained Huguenot Street Historic Preservationist Weston Davey. “Any type of graffiti, however, can be damaging to stone monuments. We are working to carefully remove the graffiti to ensure that the pigment does not penetrate further into the porous stone.”

This nearly 300-year-old burial ground dates back to the very first Huguenot settlers in New Paltz.  A number of the original Patentees are buried in this sacred place and it is the first known burial ground in New Paltz. For 120 years, it has been the mission of Historic Huguenot Street to protect the legacy of the Huguenot families that established our village by preserving the buildings, documents, and objects they left behind, including this burial ground.

If anyone has any information about this unfortunate incident, please contact Historic Huguenot Street at (845) 255-1660 or info@huguenotstreet.org.

A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original 1678 settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.  It was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve their French and Dutch heritage.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today. 

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Bringing the Wicked to Justice, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“Mama, Tell Sam Who Hurt You….” Part II

Erie Railroad-Library of Congress

Mrs. Rogers recounted to the detectives that not only did her husband know Ingerick, but Ingerick told Mr. Rogers that the two brothers kept large sums of money in the house. Mrs. Rogers also remembered seeing her husband with a gas pipe 2′ long when he left that morning, and when he came back he had bloodstains on his clothing.  After the crime, Rogers had jumped on the Erie Railroad to Otisville. When he thought the coast was clear he took the Orange County Express to Port Jervis. It was from there he eventually ended up in California, but the question remained, where?

Another break in the case came about a year later, in October 1907, when Mr. Rogers mailed a letter to his brother George Rogers living in Middletown. A stroke of luck for investigators occurred when the mailman delivered it to the wrong address. Instead of the George Rogers it was intended for, it was delivered to another individual with the same name.  This man knew, after he read the letter, that the police might be interested in its contents. The postmark was from Madeira, California where Rogers was working as a porter at the Yosemite Hotel, reported The New York Times. He changed his name to an alias, Charles H. Carpenter. When detectives made it to Madeira, they were informed that he had quit his job. After just missing the suspect, Pinkerton Detectives were lead to believe that Rogers had moved on to Los Angeles. They decided to send a decoy letter to the L.A. Post Office for a Charles H. Carpenter. The decoy letter worked Rogers was nabbed with the letter in his hand on April 10, 1907, by L.A. Police.

"Old Sparky"- Library of Congress

According to The Los Angeles Herald, the Middletown Chief of Police along with Orange County Sheriff Abraham Decker and Undersheriff F.C. Hock arrived in L.A. on April 25, 1907. It was on the way back that the officers with Rogers obtained a written and signed confession from him. According to his confession, Roger recounted that at about 9 o’clock A.M. he saw “Willis Onley in the barnyard. I asked him when Fred would get back from taking the milk. He said, `I don’t know but he ought to be back pretty soon.’ I remained there in the barnyard and talked with Willis until Fred returned about fifteen or twenty minutes later. I asked them to go to the woods with me to help get a man.” Rogers claimed he was a detective. After shooting the two men, he went to the house and told Mrs. Ingerick that Fred had been kicked by a horse in the barn. When they arrived in the horse barn he clubbed her with a piece of gas pipe.

When asked why he killed Mrs. Ingerick it was out of fear she would report him. This was also the reason he killed nine year old Alice. He told authorities that he also robbed the brothers of a pocketbook, and had hidden it, along with a checkbook, in a stone wall. After many days scouring the property they still could not locate the pocketbook or the checkbook. A few days later, both were found by George F. Richards who then alerted the police near the stone wall, but not in it as explained by the suspect. Finding the stolen property convinced the authorities that there was an accomplice or accomplices. They reasoned, after Richards found the checkbook and pocketbook, that someone had to have placed the items near the stone wall. They reasoned had the items been sitting there for a year there would have been signs if exposure to the elements. They did not show any signs of being outside at all. It was of no use Rogers refused to give anyone else up to the authorities. He was arraigned on May 11, 1907, where he pleaded not guilty.

“Charles H. Rogers was convicted for the killing of Fred and Willis Olney as well as Alice Ingerick after a 1 week trial which ended on Oct 28, 1907.” His lawyers had claimed the insanity defense. When the two doctors examined him they summed it up in a letter to the court. “We do not find that the said Rogers is insane, but we do find that he is of such a low order of mental and moral development that he belongs to the defective class, and while not presuming to suggest to the Court, we believe that the ends of justice would be served if he was confined to prison for life.” After his appeals ran out Rogers was sentenced to die in the electric chair in on July 20, 1908 in Sing-Sing Prison.  Mrs. Ingerick in time fully recovered, and was able to go back to work as a housemaid.

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

 

Posted in Bringing the Wicked to Justice, City of Middletown, Orange County, Railroads, Strange Stories, Transportation, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Mama, Tell Sam Who Hurt You….” Part I

Thralls Hospital-A.J. Schenkman

“Mama tell Sam who hurt you!” Charles pleaded with his mother who laid motionless in her hospital bed. There was nothing but silence. The Middletown Chief of Police stood in the corner nervously biting his lip. He stood looking at the only survivor of a horrible crime. Sam looked over at the chief and spoke again, “Mama was it Alanson Graham?” A tremor passed over the woman’s face. This time, Georgia Ingerick spoke – “Yes.” Police Chief Brinkerhoff excitedly blurted out, “Again! Again!” Sam asked again, according to The New York Herald, and a look of horror “filled her gray orbs.” She stated again, “Yes!” This was all Brinkerhoff needed to hear. Along with County Detective Wood and Policeman Roth, the three lawmen jumped into a waiting car to Howell’s, where Graham’s farm was located, about four miles from Middletown. It is where Ingerick had lived on and off with the widower for the last four years.

The triple homicide and a fourth attempted murder on the morning of October 6, 1905, were termed by local papers as the worst crime to occur in the history of Middletown. Its brutality shocked the community because a nine year old child was one of the victims. The only survivor of the massacre was Georgia Ingerick who lay in a Thrall Hospital bed with her skull fractured in three places. She was not expected to live. Doctors cautiously told her children if she did survive, she would probably never be the same. They explained to her sons Charles and Sam that she would probably need to relearn how to walk, talk, as well as, take care of herself. Her last words before the doctors placed her fate in God’s hands was, “Alice-where is Alice?” She had not been told that Alice’s lifeless body had been found in the cellar of the Olney house by her oldest daughter Lulu who had not been home at the time of the murders. Alice’s skull had been crushed by a pipe.

Mrs. Ingerick worked as a maid for two brothers named Fred and Willis Olney since the death Willis’s wife. She lived in the farmhouse with her daughter Alice, nine years old, and an older daughter Lulu aged fifteen. It was believed that the person or persons who killed Alice, and had left her mother for dead in the barn, were also responsible for the death of the Olney brothers. They were both farmers and “also owned a store on Franklin Square in Middletown.” In addition they were known to have accumulated a substantial amount of wealth. Their bodies were found a short distance from the house in a woodlot.  Each brother had been shot multiple times at close range. Their pockets had been turned inside out in what appeared to be a robbery. The killer absconded with $16.00. The primary suspect in early October was Alanson Graham.

Graham, according to most newspaper accounts, was found by law enforcement sitting in his doorway reading a newspaper and smoking a pipe. He was calm, almost expecting law enforcement. When questioned by the chief, Graham calmly stated he knew nothing about the murders or the attempted murder of Ingerick. He calmly went back to smoking his pipe. Law enforcement searched the property and found a newspaper with the crime on the front page. In a wagon was found a local paper from August 28th, in addition to a gas pipe wrapped in a newspaper from September 15. Once in the home, finally, under the kitchen table was a pair of stained overalls. Graham was brought to police headquarters for questioning. However, after producing a concrete alibi he was released.

Mrs. Ingerick’s health, to the amazement of her doctors, started to improve. Almost overnight she started to regain her functioning to the point that she could recall anyone who visited her, and even the events of her life. What perplexed the doctors and investigators was her inability to recount the events leading up to her attack.  By October 22, 1905, investigators began to believe that she was deliberately shielding her attackers. They were relatively sure that she knew the person or persons who attacked her. She still had not been told that her nine year old daughter had been killed. Doctors were afraid that the shock might cause her improving health harm. They cautioned that she needed to be stronger for her to take such a blow. So she could not find out the details of the case or the dead, her sons were forbidden contact with their mother. Any individuals entering the room were shadowed by law enforcement.

After numerous searches and interrogations, including with blood hounds borrowed from Napanoch Reformatory, Milton Cuddebach emerged as a promising suspect. Cuddebach was working on a neighboring farm around the time of the tripe murder. Eyewitnesses noted that after the murder he had left the area quickly, and did not show up for work the next day. When police finally caught up with Cuddebach, he was so drunk, that when arrested he could not even walk up the stairs of the police station. Police thought they might have found at least one of the murderers because found in his Cuddebach possession was a stolen .32 caliber revolver. The revolver just happened to be the same caliber as the one used to kill the Olney brothers. It was also reported to authorities that Cuddebach had been spending more money than his $7.00 wages could have allowed him. He was held in jail until police were able to search his home. The search for more suspects continued.

Still another farm hand named Little “Dan” Davis was arrested and brought to the jail in Goshen. Davis was also in Thralls Hospital when Ingerick identified him. She remembered that he had come to the door of the Olney house, and after that she could not remember what had happened. It had in fact not been Davis who had come to the door but a neighbor’s son.

The police were sure that Charles Henry Rogers, of 5 Oak Street, knew something about the murders at the Olney farm. Shortly before the attack he had been seen talking to Mrs. Ingerick. Especially incriminating was that shortly after the crime; Mr. Rogers fled leaving his wife and five children behind. Convinced that her husband was having an affair, Mrs. Roger’s decided to contact the police about what she knew about the murders. Her motive was jealously. TO BE CONTINUED!

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Bringing the Wicked to Justice, City of Middletown, Railroads, Strange Stories, Transportation | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“France in the Americas,” a lecture by David Bell

Picture Courtesy of Historic Huguenot Street

New Paltz, NY (11/01/2014)-Princeton Professor of History David Bell will give a lecture on French exploration and settlement in the Americas in the 17th and 18th centuries, starting with the founding of colonies in Acadia and Québec, as well as the founding of Louisiana at the turn of the 18th century. Bell will also discuss France’s efforts to establish a North American empire and the clash between France and Britain, culminating in the French and Indian War of 1754-63. Throughout the lecture, Bell will explore aspects of the French Huguenot experience.

 

 

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

  • 6:00pm 8:00pm
  • Deyo Hall6 Broadhead Avenue New Paltz, NY USA
  • For More Information call: Main Office & Library: (845) 255-1660 or visit their website: http://www.huguenotstreet.org

A National Historic Landmark District, Historic Huguenot Street is a 501(c)3 non-profit that encompasses 30 buildings across 10 acres that was the heart of the original 1678 settlement, including seven stone houses that date to the early eighteenth century.  It was founded in 1894 as the Huguenot Patriotic, Historical, and Monumental Society to preserve their French and Dutch heritage.  Since then, Historic Huguenot Street has grown into an innovative museum, chartered as an educational corporation by the University of the State of New York, that is dedicated to protecting our historic buildings, conserving an important collection of artifacts and manuscripts, and promoting the stories of the Huguenot Street families, from the sixteenth century to today.

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in Education, Historic Sites, Museums, Town/Village of New Paltz, Ulster County | Leave a comment

MADE IN NEWBURGH LAWN MOWER TESTED ON WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS GRAND LAWN

Washington’s Headquarters captured between 1859 and 1869-Collection of Newburgh Historical Society, Newburgh, NY.

NEWBURGH, NY – On November 9, 2014, the Friends of the State Historic Sites of the Hudson Highlands will host a talk on Newburgh’s manufacturing history at Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site. Industrial Historian Russell Lange, former President of the Newburgh Historical Society, will deliver his popular talk titled, “Made in Newburgh”. For 150 years manufacturing drove the economy of Newburgh providing jobs for over 8,000 men and women. Open to members and the general public, this free talk will take place during their annual meeting starting at 3 P.M.

 On the Fourth of July in 1850 the State of New York opened Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh. Locally, the Hasbrouck House that General George Washington took up as his headquarters during the latter part of the War for Independence was saved from possible demolition. Historically, that date marks the origin point of public preservation in the United States. Within the next two decades the nearly 3 ½ acre park the historic headquarters sat within was enlarged to 6 ½ and since, the promise to maintain this plot of land was kept. Beyond its boundaries, the rest of Newburgh continued to expand. The early 1709 settlement that once transitioned into a village was incorporated into a city in 1865. The old mills and farms that enveloped the area were replaced by manufactories, businesses, and residences. By the turn of the century industry surrounded the historic headquarters and this sliver of the past would not go unaffected.

Lawn being cut with a Coldwell Lawn Mower, ca. 1920. Photo collection of Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh, NY, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

At a time when an interest in the historical significance of the country aligned with patriotic expression, images of Washington’s Headquarters could be seen adorning the print advertisements of some businesses. The proprietors of the Standard Oil Company of New York featured in an 1920’s advertisement the image of headquarters alongside the quote, “Here, at the close of the American Revolution, Washington issued the proclamation of peace and disbanded the old Continental Army.”

Some businesses local to the City of Newburgh also included the image of the Newburgh headquarters in official stationery as can be seen in a 1887 billhead of the Jacobs’ Baking Powder Company.

 

1887 billhead of Jacobs’ Baking Powder Co. Collection of Newburgh Historical Society, Newburgh, NY.

The merging of the Revolutionary War headquarters and modern industry extended beyond print advertisements. The site’s grand lawn put to the test lawn mowers manufactured in the City of Newburgh. A photograph from the 1920’s captured the building and grounds superintendent, Robert A. McMeekin, mowing the lawn with a new Coldwell lawn mower. Children and local citizens could be seen gazing upon the superintendent from the east porch of the headquarters building.

Coldwell Lawn Mower Co. on Newburgh waterfront factory. Collection of Newburgh Historical Society, Newburgh, NY

Thomas Coldwell, a Newburgh inventor, found his own success with manufacturing lawnmowers in the 1890’s after nearly 20 years in the business. Coldwell’s original factory sat just south of Washington’s Headquarters before it moved to Newburgh’s north end after a fire destroyed it in 1910. By the end of his life in 1905 Coldwell held over 20 patents in the lawn mower field.

 

September 29, 1981 factory fire just south (left side of the image) of the museum building. Photo collection of Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh, NY, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

In September 1981 the collection at Washington’s Headquarters 1909 museum was threatened by a raging fire in a vacant factory directly south of the site. The museum, which opened to the public in 1910, was boasted to be fireproof and in the very early morning on September 29th this claim would be put to the test before sunrise. The old factory was once the Cleveland-Whitehill building where the company manufactured the “Newburgh Never-Rip” brand of overalls, shirts, and pantaloons.

Aftermath of September 29, 1981 factory fire just south of the museum building. Photo collection of Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh, NY, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

As close as the museum was to the inferno flames, the building did not catch. However, the uncontainable heat scorched the museum’s south side damaging shutters and melting window panes.

In his talk, Russell Lange will continue to illustrate the picture of an industrial Newburgh that surrounded Washington’s historic headquarters. Steam engines, lawn mowers, blue jeans, perfume, paper boxes, muslin cloth, automobiles, Christmas trees, camel hair coats and “Fabby” were all produced in Newburgh. Today most of it is gone. The talk will go into greater depth describing the rise and fall of Newburgh’s manufacturing base telling the tales of Newburgh’s inventors and entrepreneurs and their products.

Washington’s Headquarters is located at the corner of Washington and Liberty streets within the City of Newburgh’s east end historic district. Light refreshments will be provided during the 2014 Annual Meeting. For more information please call (845) 562-1195.

The Friends of the State Historic Sites of the Hudson Highlands (FSHSHH) is a registered 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization that exists in order to benefit three New York State Historic Sites – Washington’s Headquarters, New Windsor Cantonment, and Knox’s Headquarters. The supported historic sites gain from this organization’s mission to increase public awareness of the three sites’ historical and educational significance; to raise funds to be used to supplement the educational, programming and collection needs of the sites; and to offer quality education and history related items for sale to site visitors. For more information in regard to membership contact us at Friends.SHSHH@gmail.com.

Fire destroyed factory adjacent to Washington’s Headquarters. Photo collection of Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site, Newburgh, NY, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

A.J. Schenkman, Historic Huguenot Street’s Consulting Historian, teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books include “Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County,” “Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More,” and “Washington’s Headquarters Newburgh: Home to a Revolution.”  A.J. has columns in both The New York History Blog, and is a history blogger for The Times Herald Record. He is also a VIP for Teaching the Hudson Valley. He has been featured in numerous publications, venues , radio, and television.

Posted in City of Newburgh, Education, Firefighting, Historic Sites, Hudson River, Landmarks, Lost Landmarks, Museums, Orange County, Town of Newburgh | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
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    AJ Schenkman

    A.J. Schenkman teaches history in the Lower Hudson Valley. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His most recent books Include Murder and Mayhem in Ulster County and Wicked Ulster County: Tales of Desperadoes, Gangs & More, and ... Read Full

    Elizabeth Werlau

    Elizabeth Werlau is an English teacher in the Hudson Valley and is the historian for the Town of Plattekill in Ulster County. She has authored and contributed to several books on regional history, including her most recent publication, Murder and ... Read Full
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