Teen Dating Violence

Andrea Giovinazzo, FNP-C

Everyone deserves to be in a healthy and safe relationship. Unfortunately, as teens form their first romantic relationships, they often are unclear about what constitutes a healthy relationship.  Communication is key to exercising mutual respect, establishing healthy boundaries and understanding each other’s needs.

At times , physical, verbal and/or emotional abuse erodes girls’ or boys’ self-esteem, making it more difficult to summon the courage to tell someone about the abuse, let alone end the relationship.

We at Cornerstone Family Healthcare can help guide you to the  community resources that would be the most beneficial for your individual needs. In addition to directing you to the programs that best fit your unique situation, the team at Cornerstone Family Healthcare specialize in patient-centered healthcare.  If chosen to be your medical home, our staff can work with you to organize a treatment plan that will be the best for your overall health while maintaining your privacy and strict patient confidentiality guidelines

What is Teen Dating Violence and how can you recognize it?

Dating violence is a type of intimate partner violence. It occurs between two people in a close relationship. The nature of dating violence can be physical, emotional or sexual.

  • Physical— This occurs when a partner is pinched, hit, shoved, slapped, punched, or kicked.
  • Psychological/Emotional— This means threatening a partner or harming his or her sense of self-worth. Examples include name calling, shaming, bullying, embarrassing on purpose, or keeping him/her away from friends and family.
  • Sexual—This is forcing a partner to engage in a sex act when he or she does not or cannot consent. This can be physical or nonphysical, like threatening to spread rumors if a partner refuses to have sex.
  • Stalking—This refers to a pattern of harassing or threatening tactics that are unwanted and cause fear in the victim.  Dating violence can take place in person or electronically, such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online. Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship. However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

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